UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS
CENTER FOR LOWELL HISTORY
MIDDLESEX-CANAL CORPORATION RECORDS

Processed by:
Thomas C. Proctor
April 1984
Department of History
University of Massachusetts Boston 
671: Internship in Archival Methods 
Professor R. Nicholas Olsberg

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

My interest in this New England waterway has continued unabated over the past decade. During the past year and one-half I have researched and written my Masterís thesis on the construction of the Middlesex Canal, 1792-1803. This research brought me into contact with the records of the Middlesex Canal Corporation owned by the Middlesex Canal Association and housed at Lowell Universityís Lydon Library, Special Collections Division.

Use of the Corporationís records convinced me of the need to provide a more comprehensive plan of arrangement and finding aid for the collection. Hence, with the permission of Joseph Kopycinski, Director of the Lydon Library and Archivist of the Middlesex Canal Association, and Martha Mayo, Archivist of Special Collections, I began to work on these records in October of 1983 as a project for my year-long archival class given by Professor Olsberg at the University of Massachusetts in Boston.

A large debt of thanks is owed to Professor Nick Olsberg for his excellent assistance. Whether this aid involved inspecting my work at the Lydon Library, his thought-provoking lectures, or his insightful criticisms of my written work - Nickís skillful instruction had everything to do with enabling me to successfully complete this project. Any errors in the final product are, of course, solely my responsibility.


CONTENTS

Acknowledgements 

Short History of Internal Improvements 

Middlesex Canal Corporate History 

History and Conservation of Middlesex Canal Records 

Scope and Content Note 

Appraisal of Middlesex Canal Records 
Importance of the Middlesex Canal 
Available Documentation on 18th & early 19th Century American Canals 
Conclusion 

Middlesex Canal Corporation Inventory Outline 

Finding Aid to Middlesex Canal Corporation Records 
     Board of Directors 
     Treasurer 
     Land 
     Construction 
     Canal Agent/Superintendent 
     Merrimack River Canals 
     Miscellany 

Appendix 
     A. Middlesex Canal Corporation Officers 
     B. Biographical Information 
          Loammi Baldwin
          James Sullivan 

Bibliography 
     Primary Sources 
     Secondary Works 


SHORT HISTORY OF INTERNAL IMPROVEMENTS IN THE UNITED STATES

One of the greatest problems in the new nation was that of uniting its enormous wilderness and its coastal cities into an effective network of communication and transportation. Roads were of little help for the few that existed were "almost without exception ... dirt-hard and rutted or soft and muddy...."1 The answer to this transportation problem was sought by constructing canals and in canalizing rivers.

Daniel Webster captured in very spirit of the Founding Fathers when he stated, in his 1825 Bunker Hill Address, "let our age be the age of improvement." As early as 1772, Benjamin Franklin in his Canal Papers advocated canal construction as a means of internal improvement. George Washington proposed a plan to connect the Potomac and Ohio Rivers. Henry Knox put forward a plan for a connecting canal between the Charles and Connecticut Rivers. The ultimate statement in behalf of canals as a way of furthering the "age of improvement" was Albert Gallatinís 1809 report, as Secretary of the United States Treasury, proposing a complete system of inland waterways to connect all regions of the country to be built at federal expense.

In the years between the American Revolution and 1790, some thirty canal companies were incorporated in eight states with the majority of their construction cost being raised by public subscription. These early canals were crudely constructed and generally under three miles in length. The first major canal built in the United States was the twenty-seven mile long Middlesex Canal, constructed between 1793 and 1803.

1  Arthur M. Schlesinger, The Birth of the Nation. (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1969), p. 52.


MIDDLESEX CANAL CORPORATION 1772-1860

Medford, Massachusetts 
ca. 30 linear feet
36 Boxes
25 Volumes

On June 22, 1793, Governor John Hancock signed the act, chapter 21 of the Acts of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, incorporating Loammi Baldwin, James Sullivan, and four Bostonians along with Medford supporters Jonathan Porter, Ebenezer Hall, four other members of the Hall Family, and a member of the Swan family as the proprietors of the Middlesex Canal. These persons were "incorporated for the purpose of outting a canal from the waters of Merrimack River into the waters of Medford River." The legislative act granted the power of eminent domain; required proprietorsí meetings to be held in Medford; gave the proprietors the option of choosing "a Clerk, Treasurer, and other officer or officers;" provided for a voting ratio in the corporation equal to share ownership but not to exceed twenty votes; required that damage suits against the canal must be within a year of the damage; established a 5Ĺ cents-per-ton toll rate; and required the canal to be completed within ten years.2

Eight hundred shares, at a cost of two dollars a share, were quickly purchased by Bostonians and other local capitalists such as John Hancock, John Derby, Aaron Dexter, James Sullivan, Joseph Barrell, Christopher Gore, Andrew Craigie, and Charles Storer. Between 1793 and 1817, shareholders were called on for some 100 assessments totaling $740 per share. No dividends were paid until 1819. Dividends paid between 1819 and 1853 equaled a total repayment of only $559.50 per share.

On October 7, 1793, the proprietors elected its first Board of Directors with James Sullivan as President, a position he held until 1808. Proprietorsí meetings were held annually in October. Directorsí meetings were held quarterly or a frequently as needed. The Directors formed themselves into various committees (accounts, operations, purchase of lands, etc.) to deal with the business of the canal as needed. The offices of Treasurer and Clerk, at times, rotated among the Board members and sometimes these two offices were combined and assumed by the canal agent/superintendent.

The Middlesex Canal Corporation purchased 142 pieces of land, along the canal route, in the towns of Charlestown, Somerville, Medford, Winchester, Woburn, Wilmington, Billerica, and Lowell. Of the land purchased, only sixteen pieces were taken under the powers of eminent domain granted in the incorporation act.

The canal was built between 1794 and 1803 at a cost of $444,000, as reported by James Sullivan in his report from the Directors to the annual meeting of the proprietors on October 28, 1803. The canalís construction began with surveys of the canal route in August and October of 1793. Problems encountered in these early surveys convinced the Directors to employ an English canal engineer, William Weston. Weston surveyed the route in July of 1794. On September 10, 1794, construction began on the Middlesex Canal. And on the first day of October 1794, the Directors appointed Loammi Baldwin as Canal Superintendent or Chief Engineer, a position he held until 1805. The laborers who built the Middlesex Canal were mainly local farmers who contracted to build specific lengths of canal. When the canal was finally completed, on December 31, 1803, it was twenty-seven miles long, three feet deep, and thirty feet wide. On one side of the canal was a ten-foot wide towing path and on the other side, a five foot wide berm or retaining wall. The canal had a total of twenty locks and eight aqueducts.

In the process of building the canal a method for using terras (waterproof cement) in the locks was developed, methods for blasting through rock ledges perfected, and a new dump cart for moving massive quantities of earth was invented. The canalís construction, including its maintenance, served as a training ground for a number of Americaís early civil engineers such as John Sullivan, James Baldwin, and Loammi Baldwin, Jr.

The canal had been built in the hope of funneling the rural resources of white oat, pine, granite, pot ash, and farm produce from New Hampshire and Vermont into Boston. However, cost overruns in construction combined with a lower than expected usage of the Middlesex Canal produced a waterway that was ultimately a financial failure. Yet the Directors realizing that a horse could pull twenty-five tons as easily on the canal as one ton on the road, decided that the financial problems of the corporation could be handled by increasing the flow of goods down the Merrimack River and into the canal. The plan for this project was put forward by John Sullivan in 1808. Sullivanís plan called for a system of short canals to bypass the treacherous falls of the Merrimack River.

The Merrimack River Canals, built and managed by the Middlesex Canal Corporation, included: Wicasee Canal (1813, 1 lock, dam, short canal), Cromwellís Canal (1813, 1 lock, dam, short canal), Union Locks and Canals (1808, 7 locks, dams, 9 mile length), Amoskeag (or Blodgetís) Canal (1807, 2 dams, 4-9 locks, 1 mile length), Hooksett Canal (1812, 3 locks, 825 feet), and the Bow Canal (1813, 4 locks, ĺ of a mile in length). When this canal system was completed in 1816, it provided a continuous water route between Boston and Concord, New Hampshire.3

Christopher Roberts identified four periods of Middlesex Canal operation: (1.) 1804-1814, highest toll rate, mainly timber transported; (2.) 1815-1835, lower toll rates, increasing quantities and varieties of goods transported, highest dividends are paid; (3.) 1836-1842, toll rates falling, much tonnage lost to Boston and Lowell Railroad, reliance on river traffic between Boston and Concord, new Hampshire; (4.) 1843-1853, expenses greater than receipts with opening of the Concord and Nashua Railroad.4

On December 11, 1850, the proprietors of the Middlesex Canal met to request the Directors "to ask the grant of such privileges and rights... as will enable them... to covert their property into such form as to make it distributable among the corporators before it shall be totally sunk by the present discouraging condition of their affairs." While permission to liquidate the Corporationís assets was granted, authority to cease to exist as a corporation was denied. It was not until the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts decreed, on October 3, 1859, that the proprietors had ceased to enjoy their rights, that the Corporation began to see the beginning of the end. And on April 4, 1860, the Massachusetts legislature approved the courtís decree by declaring the 1793 incorporation act for the Middlesex Canal Corporation to be forfeited and annulled.

2  A February 28, 1795, legislative act allowed the Corporation to erect mills and to extend the canal from Medford to the Charles River (Charlestown's Millpond). On January 25, 1800, a legislative act gave the Corporation authorization to charge a toll of 6Ĺ cents-per-ton as a perpetual grant.

3  Passenger or freight barges traveling on the canal were required to measure between 40-75 feet in length and from 9-9Ĺ feet in width. Passenger boats were allowed to speed along at no more than 4 miles an hour. Freight barges were restricted to a maximum speed of 2Ĺ miles per hour.

4  Christopher Roberts, The Middlesex Canal, 1793 - 1860. (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1938), p. 159.


HISTORY AND CONSERVATION OF MIDDLESEX CANAL RECORDS

After the Massachusetts legislatureís April 4, 1860, forfeiture and annulment of the 1793 incorporation act of the Middlesex Canal Corporation, the Middlesex County Court ordered, on June 25, 1860, that the records of the Corporation should be delivered to the Clerk of Court to be guarded indefinitely "for the use and benefit of all parties interested therein." Storage at the Courthouse kept the documents tightly bundled in steel boxes.

In 1972, the Middlesex Canal Association acquired the Corporationís records from the Country Courthouse and placed them on deposit in the Special Collection Division of Lowell Universityís Lydon Library on September 10. Joseph Kopycinski, Director of the Lydon Library and Archivist for the Middlesex Canal Association, began and completed the arduous task of unfolding, flattening, and organizing these long neglected records.

My work on these records began in October of 1983 and was completed in April of 1984. This work has consisted largely of increasing access to the records through a new arrangement of the records and publication of this finding aid. Little has been done for these records in terms of conservation. However, I have put all documents in acid-free except items in boxes 25-28. As Mr. Kopycinski has repeatedly pointed out, the canal records have survived in relatively good condition because of the high quality of the paper used at that time. And this is quite true. Yet there does exist a need for someone within the next ten or twenty years to conserve some of the torn or fragile documents of this collection. Such documents, at present, comprise about 5-10% of the total quantity of the records.


SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE

The records of the Middlesex Canal Corporation are remarkably complete after almost two hundred years. These late eighteenth century and early nineteenth century records include: bills of lading, toll record books, and toll receipts that detail goods transported on the canal; salary checks, bill receipts, ledger books, journals, ledger sheets, orders, and letters that document the financial condition of this experiment in inland navigation, as well as, conditions for canal employees; Board minutes, reports, and letters that detail the problems and policies of an early corporation in Massachusetts; and letters, reports, and diagrams that demonstrate technological innovation.

This collection is weak in two important areas: (1.) records of the Chief Engineer during the planning and construction phases of the canal, 1790-1805, and (2.) records concerning the final eight years of the canalís operation, 1846-1854. Fortunately, both difficulties are remedied by consulting the two following archives: (1.) Manuscript Division, Baker Library, Harvard Business School, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Baldwin Papers. The diagrams, orders, and memorandums relative to his work planning and constructing the Middlesex Canal, 1790-1805. There are 254 boxes in the Baldwin collection. (2.) Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, Massachusetts, Frothingham Papers. The Richard Frothingham Papers document in the form of letters, ledgers, and bills of lading the final eight years of canal operation. From 1846-1854, Richard Frothingham was the Agent or Superintendent of the Middlesex Canal.


APPRAISAL OF MIDDLESEX CANAL RECORDS

A proper appraisal of the Middlesex Canal Corporation records can only be reached by considering the two following questions: (1) Was the Middlesex Canal important? (2) What is the extent of surviving documentation on late eighteenth and early nineteenth century American canals?

Importance of the Middlesex Canal

By the time the canal era had begun in the United States, in 1816, approximately 100 miles of canal had been constructed. Of these early canals, only three were over two miles in length. The longest canal was the twenty-seven mile long Middlesex Canal, built in Massachusetts with private monies between 1894-1803, that joined the Merrimack River in Lowell with the Charles River in Boston.5 The canal transported white oak, pine, granite, pot ash, and farm produce from New Hampshire and Vermont to Boston. The canal also provided passenger service and began transporting cotton and cloth in the 1820ís. Influential men involved in the construction and operation of the Middlesex Canal included: Massachusetts Governor John Hancock, Boston merchant Thomas Russell, Salem merchant John Derby, Massachusetts Governor Christopher Gore, and United States Senator Daniel Webster.

The Middlesex Canal was a financial failure, officially bankrupt in 1859, though a technological wonder. Americaís first generation of civil engineers were trained as they constructed and maintained this canal with its twenty locks, eight aqueducts, three foot depth, and thirty foot width.6 In fact, engineering on the canal resulted in the invention of a dump cart, reinvention of hydraulic cement, invention of a primitive water pump and development of techniques for cutting and moving massive pieces of granite.7 And it was to the Middlesex Canal that a delegation of New York State Commissioners came to gather evidence, in 1816, in support of the technological feasibility of the 363 mile long Erie Canal.8

5  George Rogers Taylor, The Transportation Revolution, 1815-1860. (New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1951), p. 32.

6  Christopher Roberts, The Middlesex Canal, 1893-1860. (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1938), p. 33.

7  Thomas C. Proctor, "The Middlesex Canal, Republican Ideology, and the Process of Emulation: A Study of the Impact of Beliefs and Models on Technological Development in Late Eighteenth Century Massachusetts." M.A. Thesis, American Civilization Program, University of Massachusetts, Boston, May 1984.

8  Carter Goodrich, ed., Canals and American Economic Development. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1961), p. 59.


AVAILABLE DOCUMENTATION ON LATE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
AND EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY AMERICAN CANALS.

There is little documentation on early American canals. One reason for this is that most of those early canals, built before 1816, were failures. Of the five archives listed below only the Erie Canal Museumís records ere truly comparable, in terms of completeness, to the records of the Middlesex Canal Corporation.

Jervis Public Library
613 North Washington St.
Rome, N.Y.
*John Bloomfield Jervis Papers - including letters concerning the feasibility of constructing the Erie Canal.

Erie Canal Museum
Erie Blvd. East
Syracuse, N.Y. 13202
*Erie Canal material from 1840, ca. 53 linear feet.

Lehigh University
Libraries
Bethlehem, PA 18015
*Maps and drawings of Lehigh Canal.

New Haven Colony Historical Society
Library
114 Whitney Ave.
New Haven, CT 66510
*Corporate records of the Farmington Canal Company.

Minisink Valley Historical Society
Library Bldg.
138 Pike St.
Port Jervis, NY 12771
*Local record of the Delaware and Hudson Canal.

CONCLUSION

Given the engineering breakthroughs resulting from the construction of the Middlesex Canal, the fact that it served as the model for the Erie Canal, and that the Corporationís records have survived largely intact; it seems proper to claim the unique nature of this collection. Clearly, the Middlesex Canal records are invaluable in their potential for reconstructing activity on Americaís first large-scale waterway.


MIDDLESEX CANAL CORPORATION INVENTORY OUTLINE

Board of Directors, 1793-1854: 2B, 2V

Treasurer, 1794-1846: 26B, 16V

Land, 1984-1852: 1B, 3V

Construction, 1772-1826: 1B

Canal Agent/Superintendent, 1801-1853: 4B, 2V

Merrimack River/Canals, 1808-1853: 2B, 2V

Miscellany, 1775-1881: 8F

Board of Directors, 1793-1854, 2B, 2V

This series includes reports, minutes, writs, letters, memorandums, and orders of and to the Proprietors and Directors of the Middlesex Canal. The Proprietorsí records include the names of the 1793 investors or subscribers in the Corporation. Each year the Proprietors appointed a Board of Directors to supervise the operation of the canal. Hence, the majority of documents in this series detail the actions of the Directors.

(For additional names of the investors or shareholders see: TREASURER, SHARE CERTIFICATES and JOURNALS AND LEDGERS.)


MIDDLESEX CANAL COMPANY INVENTORY

BOX 1 PROPRIETORSí MEETINGS, 1793-1830: 10F
FOLDERS 1-49

1. Annual Meetings

2. Annual Meetings

3. Highways

4. Lotteries

5. Meetings

6. Petitions

7. Proprietorsí Meetings

8. Seal

9. Shares

10. Subscribers

RECORD BOOK OF MINUTES, 1830-1854: 1V

DIRECTORíS MEETINGS, 1799-1835: 27F

11. Agents Applications

12. Agents - Commission

13. Chocolate Mills

15. Costs

16. Counterfeits and Counterfeiting

17. Cox Susanna

18. Dexter, Aaron

19. Dexter, Aaron

20. Directors Meetings

21. Directorsí Meetings

22. Directorsí Meetings

23. Directorsí Meetings

24. Directorsí Meetings

25. Frothingham, Richard K.

26. Grist Mill, Billerica

27. Landings, Private

28. Merrimack River Dams

29. Merrimack River Improvements

30. Merrimack River Obstructions

31. Officers

32. Pemigewassett Locks and Canals

33. Route

34. Statistics

35. Sullivan, John L.

36. Sullivan, William

37. Tileston, Whipple, and Hale

RECORD BOOK OF MEETINGS, 1830 -1854, 1 V

Book 1 - Minutes from Directors and Committee Meetings, 1830-1854
(Corporation Record Books, Box 9, No. 11)

DIRECTORSí COMMITTEES, 1797-1825,22 F

38. Agents - Duties

39. Agents - Salaries

40. Assessment Committee

41. Baldwin, James F.

42. Baldwin, Loammi (1744-1807)

43. By-laws

44. Charlestown

45. Committee Meetings

46. Committee of Directors

47. Committee on Operations

48. Committee on Operations Orders

49. Committee to Examine records of Corporation Report, Feb. 6, 1810

BOX 2 DIRECTORSí COMMITTEES
FOLDERS 1-40

1. Directorsí Committee Meetings

2. Directorsí Standing Committee Meetings

3. Finance Reports

4. Ipswich River

5. Redman, John

6. Report of Directorsí Committee

7. Shares, Lost

8. Treasurerís Accounts Committee

9. Union Locks and Canals - Lottery

10. Woburn Mill Sites

11. Acts & Reports

12. Amory, Jonathan

13. Baldwin, Benjamin F.

14. Black Brook Aqueduct Agreements

15. Charlestown Branch Railroad Company

16. Contracts

17. Damage Claims

18. Damage Claims - Billerica - 1804, 1834

19. Damage Claims - Boston - 1805

20. Damage Claims - Charlestown - 1805, 1808

21. Damage Claims - Chelmsford - 1800, 1805, 1808

22. Damage Claims - Lowell - 1840

23. Damage Claims - Medford - 1805

24. Damage Claims - Reading

25. Damage Claims - Salem - 1805

26. Damage Claims - Wilmington - 1805, 1808, 1809, 1836

27. Damage Claims -Woburn - 1796, 1801, 1803, 1805, 1806, 1807, 1808, 1809, 1812, 1815, 1841, 1851

28. Lawsuits

29. Lawsuits

30. Lawyers

31. Malden Bridge

32. Parkerís Bridge, Woburn

33. Parker, P.

34. Provisions, Inspections

35. Sudbury Meadows

36. Sudbury Meadows

37. Thatcher, Joseph W.

38. Tolls - Legislation

39. Williams, Jonathan

40. Woburn

TREASURER, 1794-1846,26 B, 16 V

The extensive series is composed of share certificates, toll records, bills of lading, journals, ledgers, letters, reports, and bills and receipts. Share certificates give names of the investors in the canal. Toll records and bills of lading detail goods transported on the canal. The Treasurerís journals, ledgers, letters, and reports detail the financial activity of the Corporation. Finally, the bill, cash, and salary receipts duplicate, or give additional information contained in the Treasurerís journals and ledgers.

BOX 3 SHARE CERTIFICATES, 1794-1833,45F
FOLDER 1-45

1. Andrew, Henry

2. Andrews, Elise

3. Apithorp, John

4. Appleton, William

5. Armory, Jonathan

6. Atkinson, John

7. Atkinson, Thomas

8. Baldwin, Loammi

9. Barrell, Joseph

10. Barrell, Nathaniel

11. Blake, Sarah

12. Boston Asylum

13. Brattle, Thomas

14. Chadwick, Elizabeth

15. City Bank of Boston

16. Codman, Catherine

17. Cordis, Joseph

18. Cushing, Thomas

19. Derby, Elizabeth

20. Derby, John

21. Dexter, Aaron

22. Foster, Bossinger

23. Gannett, Thomas

24. Gore, Christopher

25. Green, Joshua

26. Greene, Simon E.

27. Greenough, Maria

28. Guild, Benjamin

29. Guild, Elizabeth

30. Hall, Andrew

31. Hall, Joseph

32. Hall, Willis

33. Hancock, John

34. Harvard College

35. Hartshorn, Oliver

36. Hays, Catherine

37. Hays, Judah

38. Hazard, Ebenezer

39. Homes, William

40. Howard, Elizabeth

41. Howard, Elizabeth

42. Howard, John C.

43. Howard, Hepsey

44. Hubbard, Samuel

45. Jacques, Samuel

BOX 4 SHARE CERTIFICATES, 1794-1840,48F
FOLDERS 1-49

1. Johnson, Mary

2. Jones, Anna P.

3. Jones, John Coffin

4. Joy, Benjamin

5. Joy, Hannah

6. Joy, Joseph B.

7. Joy, Joseph G.

8. Langdon, Mary

9. Lawrence, Abott

10. Lawrence, Amos

11. Lawrence, Luther

12. Lawrence, William R.

13. Lloyd, James

14. MacKay, Joseph

15. MacKay, Ruth

16. Mass. Hospital Life Insurance Co.

17. Newman, Henry

18. Norton, Catherine

19. Parish, Elijah

20. Parish, Hamicah S.

21. Parkman, Daniel

22. Parkman, Samuel

23. Payne, William

24. Payne, William

25. Peck, John

26. Redman, John

27. Sigourney, Andrew

28. Sigourney, Daniel

29. Sigourney, Eliza Ann

30. Sigourney, Elizabeth

31. Sigourney, Henry

32. Sigourney, Martha Ann

33. Strong, Jeremiah

34. Sullivan, John L.

35. Sullivan, William

36. Thacher, Pete

37. Thayer, Charles

38. Tickner, George

39. Tauro, Abraham

40. Vaughan, Charles

41. Walley, Samuel H.

42. Warren, Abby

43. Warren, Edmund

44. Warren, John

45. Watson, Benjamin

46. Watson, Laura A.

47. Watson, Lucy

48. Winthrop, James

BOX 5 TOLLS, 1804-1846,39 F
FOLDERS 1-41

1. 1801-1802,1804

2. 1806

3. 1808

4. 1809

5. 1810

6. 1811

7. 1816-1834

8. 1817

9. 1818

10. 1818

11. 1819

12. 1820

13. 1821

14. 1822

15. 1823

16. 1824

17. 1825

18. 1826

19. 1827

20. 1828

21. 1829

22. 1830

23. 1832

24. 1834

25. 1835

26. 1838

27. 1838

28. 1840

29. 1841

30. 1842

31. 1843

32. 1846

33. Tolls, No Date

34. Tolls, Blackstone Canal

35. Tolls, Bow Canal

36. Tolls, Collection at Medford Basin

37. Tolls, Lowell Manufacturing Co.

38. Tolls, Pawtucket

39. Tolls, Receipts

40. Tolls - Union Locks and Canals

41. Tolls, Wiscasse Falls Dam

JOURNALS AND LEDGERS, 1793-1852,16 V

BOX 6 BILLS AND RECEIPTS, 1794-1839,492 F
FOLDERS 1-37

1. Agents - Accounts Ledger Sheets, 1821-1823

2. Appleton Co. Ledger Sheet, 1835

3. Appraisals, Land, 1798, 1808, 1841

4. Assessments Reports, 1794-1811

5. Bills of Lading 1805

6. Bills of Lading 1827

7. Bills of Lading 1830

8. Bills of Lading 1832

9. Bills of Lading 1833

10. Bills of Lading 1834

11. Bills of Lading 1835

12. Bills of Lading 1837

13. Bills of Lading 1838

14. Bills of Lading 839

15. Bills of Lading 1840

16. Bills of Lading 1842

17. Bills Payable Ledger Sheet, 1809

18. Cargo Statistics Ledger Sheet, 1813

19. Certificates of Cargo, 1834

20. Certificates of Cargo, 1835

21. Charlestown Locks Ledger Sheets, 1818

22. Financial Statistics Ledger Sheet, 1806

23. Financial Statistics Ledger Sheet, 1808

24. Financial Statistics Ledger Sheet, 1819

25. Financial Statistics Ledger Sheet, 1820

26. Income Ledger Sheet, 1807

27. Insurance, Fire, 1835 & 1844

28. Loans - James Sullivan, Dec. 26, 1803; Caleb Eddy, Sept. 1845

29. Miller, Hezekiah R. Ledger Pamphlet, 1803-1805; 6 Promisary Notes 1803-1805

30. Passports Ledger Sheet, 1808

31. Passports, Chelmsford 1804-1805, 1842

32. Passports, Chelmsford 1805

33. Muskrat - Bounties, Report Nov. 25, 1809

34. Stickney, Amos - James F. Baldwin, Amounts owed by Stickney, April 7, 1810

35. Taxes - Ad 1843; Pencil Note, ca. 1843?

36. Treasurerís Books - Abstract from the Treasurerís Books, 1795-1808

37. Wood Statistics - Ledger Sheets, 1808-1813; Thomas Kettle to John L. Sullivan, Jan. 30, 1813.

BOX 7
FOLDERS 1-36

1. 1795, Book I, p. 99

2. 1795, Book I, p. 99

3. 1795, Book I, p. 100

4. 1795, Book I, p. 100

5. 1796, Book I, p. 104

6. 1796, Book I, pp. 104-105

7. 1796, Book I, p. 105

8. 1796, Book I, p. 105

9. 1796, Book I, p. 105

10. 1796, Book I, p. 105

11. 1796, Book I, pp. 105-107

12. 1796, Book I, p. 107

13. 1796, Book I, p. 107

14. 1796, Book I, p. 107

15. 1796, Book I, p. 107

16. 1796, Book I, p. 107

17. 1796, Book 1, p. 107

18. 1796, Book 1, pp. 107-108

19. 1796, Book I, p. 108

20. 1796, Book I, p. 108

21. 1796, Book 1, p. 108

22. 1796, Book 1, p. 108

23. 1796, Book 1, p. 108

24. 1796, Book 1, p. 108

25. 1796, Book 1, pp. 108-110

26. 1796, Book 1, p. 110

27. 1796, Book 1, p. 110

28. 1796, Book 1, p. 110

29. 1796, Book 1, p. 110

30. 1796, Book 1, p. 110

31. 1796, Book 1, p. 110-111

32. 1796, Book I, p. 111

33. 1796, Book I, p. 111

34. 1796, Book I, p. 111

35. 1796, Book 1, p. 111

36. 1796, Book I, p. 111

BOX 8
FOLDER 1-24

1. 1796, Book 1, pp. 111-112

2. 1796, Book 1, p. 112

3. 1796, Book 1, p. 112

4. 1796, Book 1, p. 112

5. 1796, Book 1, p. 112

6. 1796, Book 1, p. 112

7. 1796, Book 1, p. 112

8. 1796, Book 1, p. 113

9. 1796, Book 1, p. 113

10. 1796, Book 1, p. 113

11. 1796, Book 1, p. 113-114

12. 1796, Book 1, p. 114

13. 1796, Book 1, p. 114

14. 1796, Book 1, p. 114

15. 1796, Book 1, p. 114

16. 1796, Book 1, pp. 114-115

17. 1796, Book 1, p. 115

18. 1796, Book 1, p. 115

19. 1796, Book 1, pp. 115-116

20. 1796, Book 1, p. 116

21. 1796, Book 1, p. 116

22. 1796, Book J. p. 1

23. 1797, Book J. p. 83

24. 1797, Book J. p. 83-84

BOX 9
FOLDERS 1-21

1. 1797, Book J, p. 84

2. 1797, Book J, p. 84

3. 1797, Book J, p. 84-91

4. 1797, Book J, p. 91

5. 1797, Book J, p. 91

6. 1797, Book J, p. 91

7. 1797, Book J, p. 91

8. 1797, Book J, p. 92

9. 1797, Bemis and Stearns Account

10. 1798, Book J, p. 93

11. 1798, Book J, p. 93

12. 1798, Book J, p. 94

13. 1798, Book J, p. 94

14. 1798, Book J, p. 94

15. 1798, Book J, p. 95

16. 1798, Book J, p. 96

17. 1798, Book J, p. 96

18. 1798, Book J, p. 97

19. 1798, Book J, p. 97

20. 1798, Book J, p. 98

21. 1798, Book J, p. 99

BOX 10
FOLDER 1-10

1. 1798, Book J, p. 98

2. 1798, Book J, p. 99

3. 1798, Book J, p. 99

4. 1798, Book J, p. 106

5. 1798, Book J, p. 106

6. 1798, Book J, p. 107

7. 1798, Book J, p. 107

8. 1798, Book J, p. 108

9. 1798, Book J, p. 108

10. 1798, Book J, p. 109

BOX 11
FOLDER 1-15

1. 1800. 1, Book J, p. 129

2. 1800, 2, Book J, p. 131

3. 1800, 4, Book J, p. 132

4. 1800, 5, Book J, p. 132

5. 1800, 6, Book J, p. 133

6. 1800, 7, Book J, p. 133

7. 1800, 8, Book J, p. 134

8. 1800, 9, Book J, p. 134

9. 1800, 11, Book J, p. 137

10. 1800, 12, Book J, p. 138

11. 1800, 13, Book J, p. 138

12. 1800, 14, Book J, p. 139

13. 1800, 15, Book J, p. 139

14. 1800, 16, Book J, p. 140

15. 1800, 17, Book J, p. 140

BOX 12
FOLDER 1-17

1. 1800, 18, Book J, p. 141

2. 1800, 20, Book J, p. 142

3. 1800, 21, Book J, p. 142

4. 1800, 22, Book J, p. 143

5. 1800, 23, Book J, p. 143

6. 1800, 24, Book J, p. 144

7. 1800, 27, Book J, p. 145

8. 1800, 28, Book J, p. 146

9. 1800, 29, Book J, p. 146

10. 1800, 30, Book J, p. 147

11. 1800, 31, Book J, p. 147

12. 1800, 32, Book J, p. 148

13. 1800, 33, Book J, p. 148

14. 1800, 34, Book J, p. 149

15. 1800, 35, Book J, p. 149

16. 1801, 1, Book J, p. 150

17. 1801, 2, Book J, p. 151

BOX 13
FOLDER 1-16

1. 1801, 3, Book J, p. 152

2. 1801, 4, Book J, p. 152

3. 1801, 5, Book J, p. 153

4. 1801, 6, Book J, p. 153

5. 1801, 7, Book J, p. 154

6. 1801, 8, Book J, p. 154

7. 1801, 9, Book J, p. 155

8. 1801, 10, Book J, p. 155

9. 1801, 11, Book J, p. 156

10. 1801, 12, Book J, p. 1-56

11. 1801, 14, Book J, p. 157

12. 1801, 15, Book J, p. 156

13. 1801, 16, Book J, p. 166

14. 1801, 17, Book J, p. 167

15. 1801, 19, Book J, p. 168

16. 1801, 20, Book J, p. 168

BOX 14
FOLDER 1-18

1. 1801, 21, Book J, p. 169

2. 1801, 22, Book J, p. 169

3. 1801, 23, Book J, p. 170

4. 1801, 24, Book J, p. 170

5. 1801, 25, Book J, p. 171

6. 1801, 26, Book J, p. 171

7. 1801, 27, Book J, p. 172

8. 1801, 28, Book J, p. 172

9. 1801, 29, Book J, p. 173

10. 1801, 30, Book J, p. 173

11. 1801, 31, Book J, p. 174

12. 1801, 32, Book J, p. 174

13. 1801, 33, Book J, p. 177

14. 1801, 34, Book J, p. 177

15. 1801, 35, Book J, p. 178

16. 1801, 36, Book J, p. 178

17. 1801, 37, Book J, p. 179

18. 1801, 38, Book J, p. 179

BOX 15
FOLDER 1-16

1. 1801, 39, Book J, p. 187

2. 1801, 40, Book J, p. 187

3. 1801, 41, Book J, p. 188

4. 1801, 42, Book J, p. 188

5. 1801, 43, Book J, p. 189

6. 1801, 44, Book J, p. 189

7. 1801, 45, Book J, p. 190

8. 1801, 46, Book J, p. 190

9. 1801, 47, Book J, p. 191

10. 1801, 48, Book J, p. 191

11. 1802, 1, Book J, p. 195

12. 1802, 2, Book J, p. 195

13. 1802, 3, Book J

14. 1802, 5, Book J

15. 1802, 6, Book J, p. 197

16. 1802, 7, Book J

BOX 16
FOLDER 1-12

1. 1802, 8, Book J, p. 198

2. 1802, 10, Book J, p. 199

3. 1802, 11, Book J

4. 1802, 12, Book J

5. 1802, 13, Book J, p. 208

6. 1802, 14, Book J

7. 1802, 15, Book J

8. 1802, 16, Book J

9. 1802, 17, Book J, p. 210

10. 1802, 20, Book J, p. 211

11. 1802, 21, Book J, p. 212

12. 1802, 22, Book J, p. 212

12. 1802, 23, Book J

BOX 17
FOLDER 1-13

1. 1802, 24, Book J, p. 213

2. 1802, 25, Book J, p. 219

3. 1802, 26, Book J, p. 219

4. 1802, 27, Book J, p. 220

5. 1802, 30, Book J

6. 1802, 31, Book J, p. 226

7. 1802, 32, Book J, p. 226

8. 1802, 33, Book J

9. 1802, 34, Book J, p. 227

10. 1802, 35, Book J, p. 228

11. 1802, 36, Book J, p. 228

12. 1802, 39, Book J, p. 231

13. 1803, 1, Book J, p. 233

BOX 18
FOLDER 1-16

1. 1803, 2, Book J, p. 233

2. 1803, 3, Book J, p. 234

3. 1803, 4, Book J, p. 234

4. 1803, 5, Book J, p. 241

5. 1803, 6, Book J, p. 241

6. 1803, 7, Book J, p. 242

7. 1803, 8, Book J, p. 242

8. 1803, 9, Book J, p. 244

9. 1803, 10, Book J, p. 245

10. 1803, 11, Book J, p. 245

11. 1803, 12, Book J, p. 246

12. 1803, 13, Book J, p. 246

13. 1803, 14, Book J, p. 251

14. 1803, 15, Book J, p. 251

15. 1803, 16, Book J, p. 252

16. 1803, 17, Book J, p. 252

BOX 19
FOLDER 1-13

1. 1803, 18, Book J, p. 252

2. 1803, 19, Book J, p. 252

3. 1803, 20, Book J, p. 253

4. 1803, 21, Book J, p. 253

5. 1803, 22, Book J, p. 254

6. 1803, 23, Book J, p. 254

7. 1803, 24, Book J, p. 255

8. 1803, 25, Book J, p. 255

9. 1804, 1, Book J, p. 257

10. 1804, 2, Book J, p. 257

11. 1804, 3, Book J, p. 258

12. 1804, 4, Book J, p. 258

13. 1804, 5, Book J, p. 259

14. 1804, 6, Book J, p. 259

13. 1804, 7, Book J, p. 260

BOX 20
FOLDER 1-12

1. 1804, 8, Book J. p. 260

2. 1804, 9, Book J, p. 261

3. 1804, 10, Book J, p. 261

4. 1804, 11, Book J, p. 262

5. 1804, 12, Book J, p. 262

6. 1804, 13, Book J, p. 263

7. 1804, 14, Book J, p. 264

8. 1804, 15, Book P, p. 16

9. 1805, 1 Book P, p. 17

10. 1805, 2 Book P, p. 17

11. 1805, 3 Book P, p. 18

12. 1805, 4 Book P, p. 18

BOX 21
FOLDER 1-14

1. 1805, 5, Book P, p. 20

2. 1805, 6, Book P. p. 20

3. 1805, 7, Book P, p. 21

4. 1806, 1, Book P, p. 22

5. 1806, 2, Book P, p. 23

6. 1806, 3, Book P, p. 23

7. 1806, 4, Book P, p. 23

8. 1806, 5, Book P, p. 24

9. 1806, 6, Book P, p. 24

10. 1806, 7, Book P, p. 24

11. 1806, 8, Book P, p. 25

12. 1806, 9, Book P, p. 25

13. 1806, 10, Book P, p. 25

14. 1806, 11, Book P. p. 25

BOX 22
FOLDER 1-50

1. 1812, 85, Boating

2. 1812, 86, Boating

3. 1812, 85-86, Boating

4. 1812, 21, Bounty

5. 1812, 41, Burroughs, William

6. 1812, 89, Charges

7. 1812, 103, Call, John

8. 1812, 72, Carlton, John

9. 1812, 103, Carter, George

10. 1812, 49, Coolidge, Benjamin

11. 1812, 25, Eames, John

12. 1812, 104, Farmer, Oliver

13. 1812, 83, Foster, Levi

14. 1812, 83, Foster, Levi

15. 1812, 56, Gardner, Samuel

16. 1812, 103, Goodwin, John

17. 1812, 78, Green, Robert

18. 1812, 106, Hams, Josiah

19. 1812, 83, Hyde, James

20. 1812, 30, Kettell, Thomas

21. 1812, 99, Kettell, Thomas

22. 1812, 91, Book 0, Kimball, Ezra

23. 1812, 91, Kimball, Ezra

24. 1812, 14, Knight, John

25. 1812, 105, Larkin, Abraham

26. 1812, 104, Lincoln, Lot

27. 1812, 94, Lund, Noah

28. 1812, 56, Lund, Oliver

29. 1812, 92, Mead, Nathaniel

30. 1812, 75, Mears, Nathan

31. 1812, 93, Mixer and Pearson

32. 1812, 103, Nichols, William

33. 1812, 13, Old Accounts

34. 1812, 27, Page, Ebenezer

35. 1812, 62, Pearson, Caleb

36. 1812, 37, Real Estate

37. 1812, 84, Repairs

38. 1812, 87, Repairs

39. 1812, 88, Repairs

40. 1812, 97, Repairs & Improvements

41. 1812, 115, Repairs & Improvements

42. 1812, 105, Richardson, Joshua

43. 1812, 104, Rogers, William

44. 1812, 94, Smith, Thomas

45. 1812, 78, Sprague, John

46. 1812, 60, Sullivan, John L.

47. 1812, 77, Wade, John

48. 1812, 83, Walcott, Jonathan

49. 1812, 103, Wyatt, Joseph

50. 1812,32

BOX 23
FOLDER 1-30

1. 1813, 34, Bk. O, Baldwin, Cyrus

2. 1813, 106, Bk. O, Harris, Josiah

3. 1813, 36, Bk. O, Hopkins, Samuel

4. 1813, 114, Bk. O, Hunt, Timothy & Cox, Susanna

5. 1813, 14, Bk. O, Knight, John

6. 1813, 75, Bk. O, Mears, Nathan

7. 1813, 64, Bk. O, Miller, Hezekiah

8. 1813, 93, Bk. O, Pearson, Caleb

9. 1813, 115, Bk. O

10. 1813, 116, Bk. O

11. 1813, 118, Bk. O

12. 1813, 120, Bk. O

13. 1813, 121, Bk. O

14. 1813, 121, Bk. O

15. 1813, 122, Bk. O

16. 1813, 129, Bk. O (Ebenezer Page)

17. 1813, 130, Bk. O (New Packet)

18. 1814, 143

19. 1814, 144, Bk. O

20. 1814, 145

21. 1814, 146

22. 1814, 147

23. 1814, 148

24. 1814, 149, Bk. O

25. 1814, 150

26. 1814, 151, Bk. O

27. 1814, 152, Bk. O

28. 1814, 153, Bk. O

29. 1817, 183 (Wicasee Canal)

30. 1817, 215-235

BOX 24
FOLDER 1-35

1. 1818 (Wicasee Canal)

2. 1818, 1-9 (Repairs)

3. 1818, 10-17 (Repairs)

4. 1818, 20-29 (Repairs)

5. 1818, 30-39 (Repairs)

6. 1818, 40-49 (Repairs)

7. 1818, 50-55 (Repairs)

8. 1818, 56-59 (River Meadow Brook Aqueduct)

9. 1818, 60, 62-69 (River Meadow Brook Aqueduct)

10. 1818, 70-71, 73 (River Meadow Brook Aqueduct)

11. 1818, 74-79 (Management)

12. 1818, 80-841/2, 86-89 (Management)

13. 1818, 90-99 (Management)

14. 1818, 100, 103 (Management)

15. 1818, 104-108 (Incidental Charges)

16. 1818, 112-119 (Incidental Charges)

17. 1818, 120-124, 126-129 (Incidental Charges)

18. 1818, 130, 132-133 (Incidental Charges)

19. 1818, 133-136, (River Meadow Brook Aqueduct)

20. 1818 (May-June, Packet Boat)

21. 1818 (July, Packet Boat)

22. 1818 (August, Packet Boat)

23. 1818 (September, Packet Boat)

24. 1818 (October, Packet Boat)

25. 1818 (November, Packet Boat)

26. 1818 (Ledger Sheets)

27. 1820, 1043, Bk. O

28. 1820, 90-132, Bk. O

29. 1822, 1-9

30. 1822,10-19

31. 1822,20-29

32. 1822,30-39

33. 1822,40-49

34. 1822,50-59

35. 1822,60-69

BOX 25
FOLDER 1-24

1. 1822,70-79

2. 1822,80-89

3. 1822,90-99

4. 1822, 100-109

5. 1822, 110-119

6. 1822, 120-129

7. 1822, 130-139

8. 1822, 140-149

9. 1822, 150-159

10. 1822, 160-163

11. 1823, 1-16, Bk. O

12. 1823, 17

13. 1823, 18-49, Bk. O

14. 1823, 50-74, Bk. O

15. 1823, 75-99, Bk. O

16. 1823, 100-124, Bk. O

17. 1823, 125-142, Bk. O

18. 1827, 1-2, 4-6, (Hollis Lock, Woburn)

19. 1827, 1-10 (Billerica Dam)

20. 1827, 1-18 (Gardnerís Aqueduct)

21. 1827, 1-24 (Repairs)

22. 1827, 25-49 (Repairs)

23. 1827, 50-74 (Repairs)

24. 1827, 75-95, 98-99 (Repairs)

BOX 26
FOLDER 1-19

1. 1827, 100-102 (Repairs)

2. 1827, 103

3. 1827,113-118

4. 1827, 144 (Incidentals)

5. 1827, 196-204, 209-215 (Management)

6. 1830, 1 (Repairs)

7. 1830, 2-25 (Repairs)

8. 1830, 26-50 (Repairs)

9. 1830, 51-57 (Repairs)

10. 1830, 58 (Repairs)

11. 1830, 59-65 (Repairs)

12. 1830, 121-142 (Incidentals)

13. 1830,150-165 (Management)

14. 1830,181-186 (New Lock & Aqueduct, Medford)

15. 1830, 192-196 (Canal Houses, Charlestown)

16. 1830, 198-217 (Medford Houses & Gardner Locks)

17. 1830, 218-226 (Locks, Billerica Mills, and River Aqueduct)

18. 1832, 25-49 (Accounts)

19. 1832, 164 (New Mills, Billerica)

BOX 27
FOLDER 1-16

1. 1833, 1-42 (Repairs)

2. 1833, 43-49 (Repairs)

3. 1833, 50-61 (Repairs)

4. 1833, 92-139 (Incidentals)

5. 1833, 151-173 (Billerica Mills)

6. 1833, 182-196 (Horn Pond Locks, Woburn)

7. 1833 (Misc.)

8. 1834, 62-79 (Repairs)

9. 1834, 81-112 (Repairs)

10. 1834 (Incidentals)

11. 1834 (Wages)

12. 1835, 1-36 (Incidentals)

13. 1835, 121-136 (Wages)

14. 1835, 139

15. 1835 (New Works)

16. 1835 (Repairs)

BOX 28
FOLDER 1-26

1. 1836, 1-9 (Repairs)

2. 1836, 10-19 (Repairs)

3. 1836, 20-29 (Repairs)

4. 1836,30-39

5. 1836,40-49

6. 1836, 50-53 (Repairs)

7. 1836, 60-69 (Wages)

8. 1836, 70-73 76 (Wages)

9. 1836, 86-89 (Incidentals)

10. 1836, 90-99 (Incidentals)

11. 1836, 100-106 (Incidentals)

12. 1836, 126 (Billerica Locks)

13. 1836, 131 (Horn Pond Locks)

14. 1836, 142 (Canal House, Billerica)

15. 1836, 123-125, 130, 140-141, 149-156, 163, 171 (New Works)

16. 1838, 1-49

17. 1838,50-86

18. 1838, 87-100

19. 1839, 1-25

20. 1839,25-50

21. 1839,51-75

22. 1839, 76

23. 1839 (Lock, Woburn)

24. 1839 (Misc. Nos.)

25. 1839 (No. Nos.)

26. 1839 (Committee on Repairs)

LAND, 1794-1852, 1 B, 3 V

This series includes reports, letters, memorandum, ledger sheets, and deeds detailing the Corporationís purchase of land along the canalís proposed route in theca 1970ís and the eventual sale of canal land in the 1850ís.

DEEDS GENERAL 1794-1836,5 F

BOX 29
FOLDER 1-28

1. Deeds, 1801-1808

2. Land Agreements, 1795

3. Land Agreements, 1795, 1802

4. Land Grant Maine, 1806-1836

5. Land Obligations, 1794-1795

PURCHASE AND SALES RECORD BOOKS, 1794-1851,3V

PURCHASE RECORD, 1794-1844,13F

6. Land Purchases - James Sullivan, Report, ca. 1796?

7. Billerica, 1797-1802

8. Charlestown, 1801-1844

9. Chelmsford, 1796

10. Eastern Route, Wilmington, 1794

11. Eastern Route, Woburn, 1794

12. Goffís Falls, 1844

13. Goffís Town, N. H., 1799

14. Medford, 1795-1840

15. Towns Not Identified

James Sullivan, Report, June 19, 1803

James Sullivan, Report, March 3, 1804

16. Tyngsborough, 1816

17. Wilmington, 1794-1816 18. Woburn, 1794-1816

SALES RECORD, 1808-1852, 10F

19. Land Sales, 1809

20. Billerica, 1815-1851

21. Charlestown, 1808-1827

22. Chelmsford, 1808-1851

23. Medford, 1824-1852

24. Somerville, 1852

25. Tyngsborough, 1817

26. Wilmington, 1837, 1851

27. Winchester, 1851

28. Woburn, 1827-1851

CONSTRUCTION, 1772-1826, 1B

This series includes letters, reports, and diagrams related to the construction of the canal, 1794-1805. The records of the Middlesex Canalís first Agent/Superintendent, Loammi Baldwin, are included here since his employment was primarily as Chief Engineer. Also, information is included on laborers and canal tools. (For further information on laborers see: TREASURER, BILLS and RECEIPTS.)

The Vaughan/Rennie Correspondence consists of letters between Charles Vaughan, William Vaughan, and John Rennie in March and September of 1798. These letters were prompted by Charles Vaughan (1759-1839), a Director of the Middlesex Canal Corporation and a Boston merchant, who doubted Loammi Baldwinís ability to engineer the canal. So Charles wrote to his brother, William (1752-1850), who was a civil engineer living in London, England, for advice. William, in turn, wrote to the eminent British engineer, John Rennie (1761-1821). William Vaughan and John Rennie suggested, as Charles already feared, that the project would not do well until a "proper" - that is, and English - engineer was put in charge of the canalís construction.

ENGINEERING, 1793-1826,18 F

BOX 30
FOLDER 1-26

1. Aqueduct Logs - Report, ca. 1798?

2. Baldwin, Loammi (1744-1807)

Loammi Baldwin, Canal Progress Report, Nov. 17, 1797

Loammi Baldwin, Canal Progress Report, July 3, 1798

Account of work done, Dec. 10, 1794

3. Boat Dimensions

Loammi Baldwin, Ideas on Boat Dimensions, Oct. 19, 1804

Andrew Howard, Price Estimate for Canal Boat, ca. 1804?

William Brown, March 25, 1809

Stephen Sweet, Dec. 2, 1826

4. Boat, Passenger

James Sullivan, Ad, ca. 1804 or 1805?

5. Extensions of Canal

John Cushing, Dec. 24, 1796

6. Hollisí Lock

Diagram for Stone Lock Chambers, N.D.

7. Larkin, Deacon

James Sullivan, Damage Repair Order, May 20, 1804

8. Levelling Instruments, 1808

9. Mystic River Locks

James Sullivan, Report on Lock Construction and Placement, June 19, 1803

James Sullivan, Medford Locks, ca 1803?

10. Packet Boat -- Details

Diagram, ca. 1801-1803?

11. Puzzolana - "Terra Puzzolana," Nov. 3, 1795

12. Puzzolana - Tarras

Instructions for Mixing, Oct. 1796

James Sullivan, Obtaining Tarras, May 24, 1796

Bill Receipts, 1796

13. Puzzolana - Tarras

Instruction to Josiah Banks, Capt. of Sloop Liberty, for obtaining Tarras from the West Indies, June 16, 1796

Bill receipts, Aug. 1796

Use of Tarras, July 1797

Capt. Frank, Survey, Sept. 11, 1811

14. Superintendent - Memorandum

Construction/Maintenance Techniques, May 24, 1802

15. Surveys

Mass. Independent and Universal, Sept. 1793, Vol. 25, No. 1299

16. Symmes River Bridge

Bemis & Stearn Agreement, March 25, 1802

17. Tools

Tool Lists, 1795, 1801-1808

18. William Weston

Recommendation Letter for Loammi Baldwin to Robert Morris, March 4, 1794

Account sheets of monies paid to Weston, Aug. 1, 1794

Weston to Aaron Dexter, May 12, 1795

Weston to James Sullivan, Feb. 25, 1796

LABOR, 1795-1803,4 F

19. Labor

James Sullivan, Ad for Laborers, July 23, 1800, Sept. 1803

20. Labor Agreement Forms, 1795

21. Labor Disputes

William Crosby to Loammi Baldwin, June 16, 1798

Loammi Baldwin to William Crosby, July 17, 1798

22. Stewards

Directions for Canal Steward, Signed by Benj. Fisk, June 11, 1799

VAUGHAN/RENNIE CORRESPONDENCE, 1771-1805,4 F

23. Vaughan/Rennie Correspondence

John Rennie to William Vaughan, March 6, 1798 (2 copies)

William Vaughan to Charles Vaughan, March 9, 1798

John Rennie to William Vaughan, Sept. 7, 1798

William Vaughan to Charles Vaughan, Sept. 14, 1798

24. Birmingham Canal

Navigation, April 18, 1777

Bye Laws, Sept. 25, 1772

Letter to William Vaughan, July 9, 1804

25. Thames & Severan Canal Co.

By-Laws, ca. 1790ís

Distance Chart, ca. 1790ís

Weekly Return Sheets, 1799

Bills of Lading, Forms, 1800

By-Laws, 1792

Stock & Coal Sheet, ca. 1790ís

26. Construction of Canals

Benj. Dawse petition, Oct. 20, 1797

Samuel Jaques to James Sullivan, Aug. 24, 1803

William Petterson to Richard Sullivan, April 10, 1804

John Disney to William Vaughan, June 20, 1804

Lowbridge Bright to William Vaughan, June 27,1804

Christopher Baynes to William Vaughan, June 27, 1804

Petition to extend canal to Boston, March 12, 1805

CANAL AGENT/SUPERINTENDENT, 1801-1853,4B, 2V

This series contains letters, memorandums, diagrams, reports, and ledger sheets to and by Canal Agents/Superintendents - John L. Sullivan, James F. Baldwin, and Caleb Eddy. The records pertaining to Caleb Eddyís tenure as Canal Agent/Superintendent are the most extensive since he served during the last two decades of the canalís usage, 1825-1845.

The Canal Agentís primary function was the management of the Corporationís employees and the maintenance of the canal. (See also: BOARD OF DIRECTORS, MEETINGS AND COMMITTEES)

RECORD BOOKS, 1808-1846,2V

JOHN L. SULLIVAN AND JAMES F. BALDWIN, 1808-1826,14 F

BOX 31
FOLDER 1-59

1. Agents -- Reports

Monthly Reports, 1820-1824

2. Baldwin, James F.

James F. Baldwin, Answers to Questions about the Middlesex Canal and Merrimack Canal and Merrimack River Canals, July 25, 1822

James F. Baldwin to Caleb Eddy, May 16, 1822 to James F. Baldwin, Dec. 30, 1820

3. Baldwin, James F.

James F. Baldwin to Aaron Dexter, Jan. 17, 1822

James F. Baldwin to Benj. Joy & Edward Craft, March 7, 1820

4. Charles River Bouys

John L. Sullivan, Petition, ca. 1809

5. Flour

Frederick French to John L. Sullivan, June 1, 1809

6. French, Theodore

Theodore French to John L. Sullivan, July 31, 1819

7. Fowle, John

Peter C. Brooks to John L. Sullivan, Jan. 24, 1810

8. Frost, Levi

Billerica Selectman to John L. Sullivan, Aug. 22, 1811

9. Kidder, Samuel P.

Kidder to John L. Sullivan, Aug. 13, 1810

10. McCormick, Patrick

William Blaney to John L. Sullivan, June 28, 1808

11. McGregor, Robert

Peter Thacher to John L. Sullivan, May 14, 1808

Parker Noyes to John L. Sullivan, May 15 & July 22, 1809

12. Passport - Rules & Regulations

John L. Sullivan to Thomas Kettell, April 14, 1809

13. Rum

Thorndike to John L. Sullivan, June 27, 1816

14. Sullivan, John L.

Estimate of repairs, July 16, 1810

CALEB EDDY, 1820-1845,45 F

15. Ames, J. A.

To Caleb Eddy, April 28, 1838

16. Anderson, Evans

To Caleb Eddy, Nov. 9, 1837

17. Boat, Building

13 Incoming Letters, 1820, 1840-1841

18. Boston & Maine Railroad Extension Co.

26 Reports by Caleb Eddy, June-July 1844

19. Boynton, William

3 Letters to Caleb Eddy, Feb. 1837

20. Concord, Mass.

Petition, July 16, 1825

21. Concord and Nashua Railroad

Hugh Moors & Jonas Harvey to Caleb Eddy, Aug. 29, 1841

Caleb Eddy to Directors, Sept. 1841

22. Concord River

Levi Bartlett to Caleb Eddy, Dec. 1834

Caleb Eddy to Levi Bartlett, Jan. 8, 1835

23. Copperas

Caleb Eddy to William Raynolds, May 26, 1825

Amos Binney to Caleb Eddy, June 6, 1825

24. Dividends

Joseph Moor, Memorandum, April 10, 1840

25. Eddy, Caleb, Correspondence

4 Outgoing & 3 Incoming Letters, 1826-1846

26. Farmington Canal

Henry Farnaux to Caleb Eddy, Oct. 21, 1840

27. Farnsworth, William

James F. Baldwin to Caleb Eddy, March 28, 1825

Caleb Eddy to William Farnsworth, July 23, 1825

28. Flagg, Josiah

Petition, 1840

29. Gardner, William

William Riddle to Caleb Eddy, Feb. 13, 1843

30. Glynn Coat

A. McKean to Caleb Eddy, Dec. 31, 1841

31. Hadley, Samuel F.

6 Letters to Caleb Eddy, 1829-1846

Caleb Eddy to Samuel Hadley, 1852

32. Half Way House

Petition, Oct. 18, 1831

33. Horn Pond House

6 Letters to Caleb Eddy, 1844-1845

34. Lawrence, Abbott

To Caleb Eddy, July 19, 1844

35. Lowell, Locks

Samuel F. Hadley, Nov. 6, 1835, March 20, 1839

36. Lund, Joseph

To Caleb Eddy, Aug. 13, 1837

37. Lydston, Andrew

Letter, March 23, 1825

38. Mellen, Edward

To Caleb Eddy, Jan. 30, 1844

Caleb Eddy to Edward Mellen, Jan. 31, 1844

39. Nichols, Daniel B.

To Caleb Eddy, Feb. 18, 1825

40. Orders, etc.

16 Items, 1803-1832

41. Ovens - Repairs

William Walker to Caleb Eddy, 1839

42. Pettengill

To Caleb Eddy, March 7, 1839

43. Proctor

Daniel Wilson to Caleb Eddy, June 14, 1840

44. Railroad Competition

Caleb Eddy to Josiah White, July 15, 1830

Adam to Caleb Eddy, March 9, 1836

45. Railroad Maps

Map, New England, ca. 1830ís? Hutchings to Caleb Eddy, Oct. 11, 1841

46. Riddle, Isaac

To Caleb Eddy, Sept. 20, 1841

47. Stark, Frederick

To Caleb Eddy, March 2, 1826, March 22, & April 8, 1837

Caleb Eddy to Frederick Stark, Feb. 8, 1830

48. Steamboats

William Sullivan to Caleb Eddy, Oct. 24, 1835

49. Store House, Chelmsford

Cyrus Baldwin to Caleb Eddy, June 23, 1826 Samuel P. Hadley to Caleb Eddy, May 1, 1835

50. Sullivan, William

To Caleb Eddy, Aug. 16, Oct. 24, 1836, June 28, 1839

51. Swan

Benj. Swan to Caleb Eddy, May 31, 1826

52. Talbot, Charles Potts

12 Items, 1841-1846

53. Teams

Standing Committee Instructions to Caleb Eddy, April 18, 1831

54. Tuftís Bridge, Medford

2 Items, 1825, 1827

55. Walker, Benjamin

To Caleb Eddy, Feb. 11, 1839

Caleb Eddy to Benjamin Walker, March 11, 1839

56. Webster, Daniel

Daniel Webster to Caleb Eddy, Jan. 26, 1835

57. Weston, Harrison

Locktender Notes, Aug. 1, 1839

58. Whipple, Oliver J.

Luther Lawrence to Caleb Eddy, Sept. 22, 1835

Oliver Whipple to Caleb Eddy, July 27, 1836

Luther Lawrence to Caleb Eddy, Aug. 27, 1836

59. Woburn Locks

5 Items, 1827-1828

MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS, 1801-1845, 111 F

BOX 32

FOLDER 1-59

1. Almshouse Wharf, Boston

1 Map, n.d.

Agreement with Boston, May 1811

Agreement, John L. Sullivan & William Burrough, Jan. 1814

Toll Ledger Almshouse Wharf 1822 - W. Burrough

2. Anchor

Memo, n.d.

3. Billerica Canal House

Repairs Report, ca. 1808?

4. Billerica Locks

4 Items, 1808-1809, 1826

5. Billerica Mill Dam

Saw Mill Repairs, ca. 1808?

Workers, July & Aug. 1811

Memo, n.d.

6. Boat Sales

To Caleb Eddy, Dec. 10, 1844

7. Boats

11 Items, 1804-1835

8. Boats, Charters

Bill Receipt, 1806

9. Boat--Conductors

6 Middlesex Canal Navigation Broadsides, ca. 1805 or 1806?

10. Boats Inventory, Dec. 17, 1808

11. Boats Private Statistics

Report, Oct. 1, 1809

12. Boats, Rental, 1805, 1812

13. Boats, Storage, 1811

14. Boathouse, Billerica Agreement, Aug. 25, 1808

15. Boating Costs

4 Ledger Sheets, n.d.

16. Boatmen

Work Agreements, 1809-1818

17. Boston & Concord Boating Co.

8 Ledger Sheets, 1834-1839

Letters, 1824, 1825, 1838

18. Boston Landing Statements, 1811, 1812

19. Boston Landing Leases

John Jones, April 1, 1916

20. Boston and Lowell Railroad

Boston Weekly Messenger, Thursday, July 29, 1830, Caleb Eddy, p. 1

"The Lowell Railroad and Middlesex Canal."

21. Brick Yards

Memo, ca. 1808?

22. Boston Water Supply

Petition to make the Middlesex Canal a water source for Boston, signed by Josiah Quincy, Mayor, Jan. 23, 1846

23. Bridge Agreement, Charlestown, 1844

24. Bridge Agreements, Medford, 1820, 1831

25. Bridge Agreements, Wilmington, 1802, 1803, 1810

26. Bridge Assessments, 1806, 1835

27. Bridges, Lowell - Petition 1841

28. Bridge - Petitions, Medford, 1804

29. Bridge - Releases 1805

30. Brooks, Peter C. - To James Sullivan, Jan. 9, 1802

31. Bunker Hill Tavern, Charlestown - 3 Memos, 1843-1844

32. Bouys - Diagram or Charles River System, ca 1808?

33. Certificates of Cargo, blank forms, 1840

34. Charlestown Committee on Streets, Report, 1827

35. Charlestown Mills - 8 items, 1805-1829

36. Charlestown Survey, 1806

37. Chelmsford Glass Works

John Foster to Caleb Eddy, March 22, 1825

38. Chelmsford Locks

5 Items, 1808-1814

39. Coolidge, B., 1809

40. Dam, Mill - Memo, n.d.

41. Drawbridge Rules and Regulations - 2 items, n.d.

42. Faulkner, Francis - Items, 1811-1824

43. Fences - 9 items, 1808-1844

44. Fishing Agreements - William Moors, 1827

45. Fishing Agreements - Jon Page, 1812

46. Forms, 1835, 1852

47. Fulling Mill, Billerica

John L. Sullivan, Agreement, 1808

48. Gardner Locks, Winchester - 2 items, 1804

49. Gardner, Samuel - Memo, n.d.

50. Gillisí Lock, Wilmington

Memos, 1813, 1816, 1818

51. Gilson Locks

6 Memos, 1808-1813

52. Governor Sullivan Boat, 1827, 1830

53. Grist Mill, Billerica - 9 Items, 1808-1845

54. Hadley, David - Caleb Eddy to David Hadley, Jan. 8, 1827

55. Hollis Lock, Woburn - 3 Memos, 1827-1828

56. Hoofmasterís Bridge - Petition, Oct. 8, 1833

57. Horn Pond Locks, Woburn - 15 Letters, 1809-1830

58. Horses, Dec. 1808 

59. Houses, 1808

BOX 33

FOLDER 1-32

1. Ice, Agreements, 1812, 1825

2. Improvements, Jan. 1809

3. Inventory, 1809, Landing # 1

4. Labor, 9 Items, 1808, 1839

5. Labor Agreements, 24 Items, 1803, 1817

6. Leases, Billerica, 1803-1815

7. Leases, Charlestown, 1808

8. Leases, Charlestown, 1808-1839

9. Leases, Chelmsford, 1823-1836

10. Leases, Litchfield, N.H., 1828

11. Leases, Medford, 1821

12. Licenses, Liquor, 1817

13. Locks, Repairs, Memo, Dec. 1810

14. Locktender Duties, 4 Memos, 1808-1841

15. Lumber

Cyrus Baldwin, Report, Dec. 31, 1803

13 Memos, 1808-1835

16. Lumber Surveys, 1805

17. Maintenance, 1811

18. Maps, 13 Middlesex Canal and Merrimack River Maps, ca. 1802-1943

19. Medford Basin Locks, Memo and Map, Nov. 19, 1803

20. Medford Basin Locks - 3 Labor Agreements, 1810-1811

21. Medford Basin Locks

John L. Sullivan to Samuel Gardner, April 27, 1808

Orders to Sam Buel, April 21, 1812

Memo, n.d.

22. Medford Branch Canals & Locks

Letter, 1822

Newspaper notice, 1841

23. Medford Maps

24. Medford Turnpike, Petition, Sept. 12, 1803

25. Medford Turnpike Proprietors, Newspaper Notice, 1845

26. Middlesex Water Co.

James F. Baldwin, Senate Bill #44, March 7, 1844

27. Moor, John, Boat Builder - to Caleb Eddy, Nov. 10, 1837

28. Morris Canal, Charter, 1836

29. Mules, John L. Sullivan letter 1808

30. Nashua & Lowell Railroad

Notice, Sept. 1835

Senate Bill #50, March 5, 1836

31. N.Y. Canals, Toll and Regulation Broadsides, 1828

32. Nicholsí Lock, Wilmington, 2 Memos, 1811 & 1818

BOX 34

FOLDER 1-20

1. Packet Boats

Ledger Sheet, July 1808

4 Memos, 1812-1813

2. Passengers

List of Passengers, 1802

3. Passport Form, 1830

4. Pennsylvania Canals, Canal Act Broadside, 1830

5. Raft Regulations, March 8, 1811

6. Railroad Surveys - James F. Baldwin, Map, Dec. 1828

7. Regulations

3 Pamphlets, "Regulations Relative to the Navigation of the Middlesex Canal," 1830.

8. Repairs needed, Report, Jan. 1809

9. Rules and Regulations

3 Pamphlets, "Rules, Regulations & By-Laws Adopted by the Proprietors of the Middlesex Canal," 1804

Additional Regulations, March 20, 1812

10. Sunday Travel - Order to Jaques & Hopkins, May 17, 1808

11. Toll Collectors

2 Orders, 1808

Bill receipt, 1835

12. Toll form, ca. 1802

13. Tools, receipt, 1808

14. Unfinished Business, Report, March 31, 1809

15. Union Canal (Penn.)

Toll, Penalty, and Distance Broadsides, 1830

16. Washington, Boat

Memos, Dec. 3, 1802, Nov. 30, 1804

Washington Boat Broadside, ca. 1805?

17. Water Agreements, 5 Agreements, 1801-1830

18. Water Wheels

Ledger Sheet, 1804

Benj. Joy to John L. Sullivan, Aug. 25, 1811

19. Wood Loading Regulations

John L. Sullivan, Wood Regulations, ca. 1808-1810

20. Wood Loading Forms, 1808

MERRIMACK RIVER CANALS, 1808-1853,2B, 2V

This series includes letters, orders, bills of lading, reports, memorandums, bill receipts, diagrams, and shares. Such records were maintained by Corporation employees under the direction of the Middlesex Canalís Agent/Superintendent. (See Also: BOARD OF DIRECTORS, MEETINGS AND COMMITTEES; CANAL AGENT/SUPERINTENDENT, MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS.)

AMOSKEAG/BLODGETíS CANAL, 1810-1838,13 F

BOX 35

FOLDER 1-39

1. Amoskeag Canal

Diagram, n.d.

Report to Proprietors, Jan. 25, 1825

Letters, 1825-1826, 1838

2. Amoskeag Canal, Lock Details, Diagram, ca. 1820ís

3. Amoskeag Canal, Lock, 2 memos, 1825

4. Amoskeag Dam, Letters, 1826, 1828

5. Amoskeag Falls -- Locks

Contract, 1825

Caleb Eddy to William Farnsworth, April 11, 1825

Isaac Riddle to Caleb Eddy, July 6, 1825

6. Amoskeag Canal Co. Shares

List of Proprietors, Jan. 30, 1818

2 Memos, 1817, 1831

Caleb Eddy to William Hunter, Feb. 1, 1826

7. Blodgetís Canal, History of Canal, ca. 1810?

8. Blodgetís Canal Accounts, Treasurerís Report, Dec. 29, 1813

9. Blodgetís Canal Court Cases, Report, Feb. 5, 1812

10. Blodgetís Canal Damage Claims, Report, Jan. 1814

11. Blodgetís Canal Land Purchases, Memos, 1810 & 1811

12. Blodgetís Canal Shares, 21, Items, 1810-1815

13. Blodgetís Canal Treasurerís Reports, 3 Ledger Sheets, 1811.

BOW CANAL, 1817-1843,12 F

14. Bow Canal, French to Caleb Eddy, April 29, 1838

15. Bow Canal Accounts, Ledger Sheet, Jan. 21, 1843

16. Bow Canal Agents, George Kents to Caleb Eddy, April 5, 1825

17. Bow and Hooksett, Bill of Lading, ca. 40 Items, 1843, 1845

18. Bow Canal Dams, R.B. Sherburne to Caleb Eddy, March 31, 1841

19. Bow Canal Co. Bills, 1829, 1842

20. Bow Canal Labor Agreements, 1817, 1843

21. Bow Canal Locks, Letters, 1839, 1842-1843

22. Bow Canal Meetings, Announcements, 1827, 1840-1843

23. Bow Canal Reports

Treasurerís Report, Sept. 1808

Proprietorsí Meeting Minutes, 1826, 1842

24. Bow Canal Shares

Certificates, 1843

Proprietors List, Feb. 28, 1826

Hutchins to Caleb Eddy, Feb. 12, 1843

25. Bow Canal Taxes, 1841, 1843

CROMWELLíS CANAL, 1826-1841,2 F

26. Cromwellís Falls, Land Purchases

William Riddle to Caleb Eddy, Feb. 6, 1841

27. Cromwellís Falls, Locks

Letters, 1826-1827, 1829-1830, 1840

HOOKSETT CANAL, 1815-1842,12 F

28. Hooksett Canal

Memo, ca. 1815

5 Letters, 1840-1844

29. Hooksett Canal Bills

Memos, 1838, 1842

Bill Receipt, 1840

30. Hooksett Canal Leases, Nov. 20, 1815

31. Hooksett Canal Shares

William Sullivan, Report, March 9, 1829

32. Hooksett Canal Share, Appleton, William

33. Hooksett Canal Share, Baldwin, James F.

34. Hooksett Canal Share, Head, Nathaniel

35. Hooksett Canal Share, Mass. Hospital Life Insurance

36. Hooksett Canal Share, Pratt, Leonard

37. Hooksett Canal Share, Sullivan, William

38. Hooksett Canal Dam

Labor Agreement, 1825

Richard Ayer to Caleb Eddy, April 15, 1825

39. Hooksett Canal Locks

memos 1817, 1825, 1834

6 Letters, 1826, 1827, 1843

MERRIMACK RIVER RECORD BOOKS, 1808-1811,2 V

MERRIMACK RIVER NAVIGATION, 1812-1846,12 F

BOX 36
FOLDER 1-36

1. Merrillís Falls Obstructions

William Sullivan to Caleb Eddy, June 23, 1836

John Moors to Caleb Eddy, Sept. 22, 1840

William Riddle to Caleb Eddy, July 29, 1944

2. Merrimack Boating Co.

Ledger Sheet, 1817

Report, Feb. 3, 1823

3. Merrimack River Leases, John L. Sullivan, Feb. 5, 1817

4. Merrimack River Canals

Condition Report, Jan. 1812 - Memos. n.d.

5. Merrimack River Canal Locks

6 Letters to Caleb Eddy, ca. 1830ís

6. Moorís Falls Locks, 4 Memos, 1818-1830

7. Nashua River, Obstruction Report, ca. 1809

8. Pawtucket Falls Dam Petition, 1810 Voting Record, n.d.

9. Pawtucket Canal Laws and Legislation, 1825

10. Proprietors of Locks and Canals of Merrimack River

Proprietorsí Lists, 1834

15 Items, 1834-1835

11. Water Power, Report, 1853

12. Sewalís Falls, Map/Sketch, Oct. 1811

UNION LOCKS AND CANALS, 1809-1844,15 F

13. Union Locks and Canals, 8 Letters to Caleb Eddy, 1839

14. Union Locks and Canals, Memo 1833

15. Union Locks and Canals, Court Suit 1809

16. Union Locks and Canals, Tool List, n.d.

17. Union Locks and Canals, Labor Agreement, 1825

18. Union Locks and Canals, Obstructions, 4 Letters, 1827, 1836, 1837, 1841

19. Union Locks and Canals, Organization

2 Reports, 1809

Caleb Eddy to Robert Reed, June 12, 1844

20. Union Locks and Canals - Petitions

William Riddle to William Sullivan, April 9, 1828

21. Union Locks and Canals - Repairs

2 Letters, 1824

Report, Aug. 1829

Memo, n.d.

22. Union Locks and Canals - Shares, Tax Receipts, 1844, 1847

23. Union Locks and Canals - Shares

25 Bill Receipts, 1829-1834

2 memos, 1928-1833

2 Letters, 1844

3 Ledger Sheets, 1844

24. Griffinís Falls Locks, William Riddle to Caleb Eddy, May 18, 1829

25. Mitchell, John, Bankruptcy Notice, 1842

26. Railroad, Concord, Deed from Union Locks and Canals to Concord Railroad,

October 20, 1842

27. Union Locks and Canals, Tolls

Toll Abstract, 1817

Account Sheet, 1844

WICASEE CANAL, 1825, 1841, 1 F

28. Wicasee Locks

John Dix to Caleb Eddy, March 11, 1825

Caleb Eddy to John Dix, March 15, 1825

John Dix to Caleb Eddy, March 24, 1825

Caleb Eddy to John Dix, March 25, 1825

Samuel P. Hadley to Caleb Eddy, May 7, 1841

MISCELLANY, 1775-1881, 8 F

This series contains letters, pamphlets and a diary that are not properly part of the Corporationís records. However, some of the information is related to such canal personalities as Loammi Baldwin.

29. Baldwin, Loammi, Jr., Letter Cover, ca. 1810ís

30. Baldwin, Mary, Copy of 1775 Letters between Loammi and Mary.

31. Baldwin, Sarah Ditkin, Letters, 1865, 1873

32. Deposition - N.H., Form, ca. 1810ís?

33. Diaries, 4 Sheets, Water Levels in Sudbury River, ca. 1832?

34. Mill Power, Essex Company Brochure, ca. 1850ís

35. Patents Great Britain, Petition, n.d.

36. Receipts, "Clothes Cleaner," Oct. 13, 1881


APPENDIX

A. MIDDLESEX CANAL CORPORATION OFFICERS

DIRECTORS

1793

Loammi Baldwin

Joseph Barrell

John Brocks

Andrews Craigle

Ebenezer Hall

Samuel Jaques

Jonathan Porter

Thomas Russell

Ebenezer Storer

James Sullivan

Caleb Swan

1805

Joseph Coolidge

Aaron Dexter

Christopher Gore

Benjamin Hall

John Coffin Jones

Benjamin Joy

Mungo Mackay

Ebenezer Oliver

William Payne

James Sullivan

James Winthrop

1814

Ebenezer T. Andrews

Jonathan Amory

James F. Baldwin

Joseph Coolidge

Edward Cruft

Aaron Dexter

Benjamin Guild

Dudley Hall

Benjamin Joy

William Payne

William Sullivan

Abraham Touro

1830-1837

Charles Francis Adams

Ebenezer T. Andrews

William Appleton,
Succeeded by George Kuhn, 1837

James F. Baldwin

Ebenezer Chadwick

Joseph Coolidge

Benjamin Guild

Dudley Hall

George Hallett

Joseph B. Joy,
Succeeded by Abbot Lawrence, 1834

Thomas W. Phillips

William Sullivan

Peter O. Thatcher

(The Board was reduced to seven in 1838)

1838-1839

Charles Francis Adams

Ebenezer Chadwick

George Hallett

Abbot Lawrence

Luther Lawrence

William Sullivan

Peter O. Thatcher

(The Board was reduced to five in 1840)

1840-1850

Charles Francis Adams

Ebenezer Chadwick

George Hallett,
Succeeded by William Sturgis, 1846

Abbot Lawrence,
Succeeded by William Appleton, 1850

Peter Thatcher,
Succeeded by Amos A. Lawrence, 1841

1851-1854

Charles Francis Adams,
Succeeded by George Kuhn, 1852; who was
Succeeded by Abbot Lawrence, 1853

William Appleton

Ebenezer Chadwick

William Lawrence,
Succeeded by Amos A. Lawrence, 1854

William Sturgis

PRESIDENTS

1793-1808 James Sullivan

1809-? Aaron Dexter

? - 1830 Benjamin Guild

1831-1840 Peter O. Thatcher

1841-1849 Abbot Lawrence

1850-1853 Ebenezer Chadwick

1854 -? Abbot Lawrence

AGENTS OR SUPERINTENDENTS

1794-1805 Loammi Baldwin

1806-1807 Samuel Jaques

1808-1820 John L. Sullivan

1821-1824 James F. Baldwin

1825-1845 Caleb Eddy

1846-1854 Richard Frothingham


B. BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

LOAMMI BALDWIN Born; Jan. 10, 1744 - Died: Oct. 20, 1807

Born and died in Woburn, Massachusetts. Apprenticed in cabinet-making as a boy. His formal education came during the spring of 1771 when he walked several times each week, with his friend Benjamin Thompson, to Harvard College in Cambridge to hear lectures on mathematics and physics by Professor John Winthrop.

During the Revolution, Baldwin served as a Colonel in the 26th Regiment. Ill health caused him to be honorably discharged in 1777. He served as a member of the Massachusetts General Court from 1778-1779 and 1800-1804. Baldwin was sheriff of Middlesex County from 1780-1794. In 1785, he was awarded an honorary masterís degree by Harvard College.

Among Baldwinís feats of engineering: the design of the Charles River Bridge in Boston (completed in 1786), consultant work on the Pawtucket Canal in Lowell (1794), and Chief Engineer for the Middlesex Canal (1794-1805).

He married twice: in 1772 to Mary Fowle and in 1791 to Margery Fowle.

Sources:

Abbott, Frederick K. "The Role of the Civil Engineer in Internal Improvements: the Contributions of the Two Loammi Baldwin, father and Son, 1776-1838." PhD Dissertation, Columbia University, 1952.

Dictionary of American Biography. New York: Charles Scribnerís Sons, 1963. Vol. 1, pp. 539-540.

Vose, G. L. A Sketch of the Life and Works of Loammi Baldwin, Civil Engineer. Boston, 1885

JAMES SULLIVAN Born: April 22, 1744 - Died: Dec. 10, 1808

Born in Berwick, Maine and died in Boston, Massachusetts. Formal education resulted from his work in his brother Johnís law office.

During the Revolution, Sullivan was a member of the Provincial Congress of Massachusetts and of the Committee of Safety. He served in the Superior Court and State legislature in Massachusetts. And he was Attorney General for Massachusetts from 1790 to 1807. Sullivan was a close friend of John Hancock. In 1797, Sullivan lost in his bid to be Governor of Massachusetts, but won when he ran in 1807.

Sullivan had a deep interest in "public improvements" and is, therefore, considered to have been the intellectual force behind the promotion of the Middlesex Canal. Also, he wrote extensively on political and economic issues.

Sullivan married twice: in 1768 to Mehitable Odiorne and in 1786 to Martha Langdon.

Sources:

Amory, T. C. Life of James Sullivan: With Selections From His Writings. 2 vols. Boston, 1859

Dictionary of American Biography. New York: Charles Scribnerís Sons, 1964. Vol. 9, pp. 190-191.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

PRIMARY SOURCES

Archives

Articles

Book

SECONDARY WORKS

Articles

Books

Middlesex Canal